WordPress Myths Debunked

Not only does WordPress power 29% of the entire internet, it takes up 50-60% of the CMS market share, making it the most widely used CMS in the world. Whether you are setting up a blog, reviving your website, or launching your online enterprise presence, many will recommend that you use this CMS due to its “jack-of-all-trades’ nature.

However, along with this success comes doubters who think the platform isn’t scalable or secure. We are here to silence those doubters by debunking some common myths about WordPress.

WordPress is Just for Blogging

It is true that WordPress is excellent for blogging as it is not only simple to install, but it is also easy to operate. Even so, it is not right to suggest that blogging is all that this CMS is good for.

Over the years, thousands of developers have helped expand its functionality, which has enabled it to mature into a robust and versatile tool that is capable of supporting even the most complex sites. It can support digital experiences for any enterprise site.

WordPress is Good for Small Businesses Only

That was true a couple of years ago, but not anymore. With advancements and some remarkable features being integrated into it, WordPress has since become a scalable and flexible CMS that is easily adjustable to suit different needs.

Today, this platform has become a reliable solution not just for small enterprises, but also for big web projects. CNN, Ford, and The New York Times are just but a few examples of the big enterprises that rely on WordPress for their web projects.

WordPress is the Least Secure CMS

It is true that WordPress can be susceptible to hacking, Trojan threats, viruses, and other web attacks. But again, is there any software that’s 100% foolproof? Due to its popularity, WordPress may simply be a bigger target, but it does not necessarily mean that it’s the least secure among other CMS solutions.

The beauty of WordPress is that it is open source, which means anyone that finds a vulnerability can create a patch to fix it. This means there are thousands of people working to make sure the platform stays secure. On top of this, there is an entire team dedicated to making sure all vulnerabilities are taken before of before they can be exploited.

SEE: Tips to Protect Your WordPress Website From Being Hacked

WordPress isn’t Ideal for Commercial Use

The fact that WordPress is absolutely free makes some people assume that it’s inept for commercial use. Truth is, WordPress is also an ideal tool that can be utilized for commercial use. While there are many services that will allow you to use this CMS for free, there are other services that charge a premium price for personalized hosting.

With a managed WordPress host, you can run an ecommerce site quite effectively and due to the fact that WordPress is an open source platform, it has allowed various contributors to provide plugins solutions for SEO, SEM and many other important aspects making it one of the best platform for commercial use.

WordPress Doesn’t Provide Customer Support

Being an open source platform means that WordPress is not owned by a single person or company. The question that most people ask is – who will we run to when we run into problems? Even though this CMS does not have official support, it does not necessarily mean that customer support is unavailable altogether.

In case you get stuck, the platform provides users with various effective ways and resources where they can get help, including email lists, support forums, groups in social media, WordPress Codex, etc. Your hosting company, plugin developers, and theme developers will also provide excellent customer service.

Conclusion

Opinions regarding WordPress are many and you may not be able to tell whether they are all true. It is always wise to rely on a professional to debunk the myths and separate them from the facts.

Lisa loves WordPress and is considered a guru among her colleagues, she has launched countless WordPress websites and have optimized them for maximum speed.

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